Smiles and thumbs up from Hingham Primary School children as Prince William stops for a picture
The Prince of Wales stopped for a photo and high fives with schoolchildren on a visit to the Royal Norfolk Show.

William attended the agricultural event near Norwich, where he met a number of people and presented awards.

Children from Hingham Primary School sang him a rendition of Revolting Children from Matilda the Musical, which he said his daughter played “the whole time”.

He also stopped to speak to an ex-air ambulance colleague to reminisce.The prince, 41, took the photo with the children as he was about to leave the showground.

As they sang to him, he said, “I love that song; Charlotte plays it the whole time.”

He also spoke with a former air ambulance colleague while meeting emergency service workers.

Recognizing doctor Neil Berry, William joked there were “some familiar faces”.The prince, 41, took the photo with the children as he was about to leave the showground.

As they sang to him, he said, “I love that song; Charlotte plays it the whole time.”

He also spoke with a former air ambulance colleague while meeting emergency service workers.

Recognizing doctor Neil Berry, William joked there were “some familiar faces”.
The prince was an air ambulance pilot for two years, from 2015 to 2017, flying helicopter missions for the East Anglian Air Ambulance.

Dr. Berry, 46, said he told the prince the team missed him and that it “would be good to have you back”.

He described William as a “brilliant guy and brilliant pilot” and said it was a “pleasure” to see him again.

“He was great; if we went to really rough jobs, we would all get in touch, including him, and we’d follow up on how patients were and check everyone was OK,” he said.
During the visit, William also met staff and volunteers from East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices, local veterans, and Scouts and Girl Guides.

He presented a series of prizes to beef and dairy handlers, with the last trophy being the Queen’s prize to a champion goat and its exhibitor, Teigh O’Neill.

The trophy, first presented 42 years ago, goes to a different type of animal each year.

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