Exclusive: What is Britain’s ‘most dangerous plant’? Man injured by Giant Hogweed
A teen was left with a blister as big as an orange and struggling to dress himself after a moment of contact with giant hogweed.☠️GIANT HOGWEED☠️It’s that time of year when Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is in full bloom in the woods. The sap is dangerous to humans & dogs and may cause painful skin

A teen was left with a blister as big as an orange and struggling to dress himself after a moment of contact with giant hogweed.

☠️GIANT HOGWEED☠️

It’s that time of year when Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is in full bloom in the woods. The sap is dangerous to humans & dogs and may cause painful skin irritation and blistering. Pls be careful…it looks like very large Cows Parsley… pic.twitter.com/KgcljCUNwf

— FGVW (@FGVWinfo) June 8, 2019

Giant Hogweed known as Britain’s most dangerous plant has been spotted across the UK including in west London where a man came into contact with the toxic plant.

It can cause blisters and ulcers.

Giant Hogweed was introduced to Britain and Europe in the 19th century, from the Caucasus Mountains.

The earliest documented reference to the plant has been traced back to the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew Seed List of 1817, where seeds of the plant were listed.

If Giant Hogweed comes into contact with the eyes, it can also cause blindness.

Daniel Logan was stung on the ankle by the toxic plant in Boston Manor Park, west London, the BBC reports.

He had gone into some bushes to find a football when he came into contact with Giant Hogweed.

As a result, he has been left with ‘potentially lifelong scars’, according to the BBC.

Logan told the BBC: ‘It’s been terrible to be honest.

‘Now I know, it will never happen again,’ he added.He continued: ‘But I’m lucky, I’m 21 years old and it’s only my ankle.

‘If a little kid falls in there, gets it on their face or something, that’s going to cause them life-changing injuries so I’m lucky but someone else may not be.

‘If I had seen some signs I wouldn’t have gone down into the bush. I’ve only gone in to get the ball for my brother but if I was made aware what it was and what it could do to you, I definitely wouldn’t have gone in there.

Giant Hogweed, also known by its Latin name Heracleum Mantegazzianum, originated in Southern Russia and Georgia.

The plant is part of the Apiaceae family, which includes well-known vegetables and herbs like parsley, carrot, parsnip and coriander.

Giant Hogweed was introduced to Britain and Europe in the 19th century, from the Caucasus Mountains.

The earliest documented reference to the plant has been traced back to the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew Seed List of 1817, where seeds of the plant were listed.

The plant itself can reach over 10ft in height and, according to The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS): ‘most gardeners will want to eradicate it, as it is potentially invasive and the sap can cause severe skin burns’.

The sap contains a chemical called furocoumarin which makes the skin sensitive to the sun, which can cause bad blistering.

The blistering can even recur over the span of months, and even years.

Giant Hogweed can cause harm to both humans and dogs.

How do I treat Giant Hogweed burns?

If you accidentally get Giant Hogweed sap on your skin, Healthline says that you should wash the area with mild soap and cool water as quickly as possible.

You should keep the skin covered when you’re outside to protect it from the sunlight.

If a rash or blister begins to form, you should seek medical attention. Your treatment will depend on how severe your reaction is.

‘Skin irritation that’s caught early might be treated with a steroid cream and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, to relieve pain,’ Healthline explains.

It adds: ‘Severe burns could require surgery to graft new skin over the damaged skin.’

Healthline also explains that the Giant Hogweed sap can damage more than just your skin – if the sap gets in your eyes, you can experience either temporary or permanent blindness.

Similarly, breathing in sap particles can result in respiratory problems.

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